“There are six people in my family. When we were young we were very poor and our parents couldn’t afford to send us to school. My mum was very good at weaving and that was the only way for us to earn a living,” says 39-year-old Mrs Sang. “I learned to weave when I was just 10, under my mother’s guidance.”

She told us that weaving, like other handicrafts, requires patience and takes time. For a new learner it takes at least three months to learn the basic skills. In addition, the weaver must have passion, otherwise it will take much longer to learn.

For travellers wishing to have a real insight into this traditional Lao craft which demands both passion and dexterity, ASIAPLUS TOURS has arranged a special visit to a rural weaving village, combined with an in-depth seminar on weaving hosted by respected local NGO Ock Pop Tok-(link www.ockpoptok.com/).

You’ll be met at your hotel and taken to a charming village which lies hidden along the banks of the Mekong River, just a few kilometres from the city centre. Inaccessible to road vehicles, it is around half an hour’s walk from the main road. This is one of the most unspoiled traditional Lao villages in the area. Almost all of the women in the village work with textiles, while the men make traps for fishing on the Mekong. Although it is situated close to the city, entering the village is like entering another world, with the rattle of the weavers’ looms clacking away all day long. On arrival, you can take your time to interact with the weavers, as our guides explain to you the various tools and weaving processes.

“One of the most challenging tasks for a weaver is to invent new motifs so that you can produce textiles which are different from others on the market and thus attractive to buyers,” revealed Mrs Sang. “That requires creativity and an eye for detail.”

At noon, a home-cooked lunch will be served. Then in the afternoon, you’ll attend a seminar on sericulture, natural dyes, weaving techniques and symbolism in Lao textiles, hosted by local NGO Ock Pop Tok, which works to empower women through their traditional skills, as well as promoting the beauty of Lao textiles across the globe.

Many visitors are overwhelmed by the beauty and quantity of Lao textiles, and during the seminar experienced speakers who have lectured in Australia, Singapore, Thailand and the USA will answer all of your queries. The talk will take place in a covered workshop on the banks of the Mekong. During the seminar you’ll be served cocktails and you’ll be able to enjoy the peaceful scenery over the mystic Mekong before transferring back to your hotel for the night.

Luang Prabang traditional weaving tour and seminar

“There are six people in my family. When we were young we were very poor and our parents couldn’t afford to send us to school. My mum was very good at weaving and that was the only way for us to earn a living,” says 39-year-old Mrs Sang. “I learned to weave when I was just 10, under my mother’s guidance.”

She told us that weaving, like other handicrafts, requires patience and takes time. For a new learner it takes at least three months to learn the basic skills. In addition, the weaver must have passion, otherwise it will take much longer to learn.

For travellers wishing to have a real insight into this traditional Lao craft which demands both passion and dexterity, ASIAPLUS TOURS has arranged a special visit to a rural weaving village, combined with an in-depth seminar on weaving hosted by respected local NGO Ock Pop Tok-(www.ockpoptok.com).

You’ll be met at your hotel and taken to a charming village which lies hidden along the banks of the Mekong River, just a few kilometres from the city centre. Inaccessible to road vehicles, it is around half an hour’s walk from the main road. This is one of the most unspoiled traditional Lao villages in the area. Almost all of the women in the village work with textiles, while the men make traps for fishing on the Mekong. Although it is situated close to the city, entering the village is like entering another world, with the rattle of the weavers’ looms clacking away all day long. On arrival, you can take your time to interact with the weavers, as our guides explain to you the various tools and weaving processes.

“One of the most challenging tasks for a weaver is to invent new motifs so that you can produce textiles which are different from others on the market and thus attractive to buyers,” revealed Mrs Sang. “That requires creativity and an eye for detail.”

At noon, a home-cooked lunch will be served. Then in the afternoon, you’ll attend a seminar on sericulture, natural dyes, weaving techniques and symbolism in Lao textiles, hosted by local NGO Ock Pop Tok, which works to empower women through their traditional skills, as well as promoting the beauty of Lao textiles across the globe.

Many visitors are overwhelmed by the beauty and quantity of Lao textiles, and during the seminar experienced speakers who have lectured in Australia, Singapore, Thailand and the USA will answer all of your queries. The talk will take place in a covered workshop on the banks of the Mekong. During the seminar you’ll be served cocktails and you’ll be able to enjoy the peaceful scenery over the mystic Mekong before transferring back to your hotel for the night.

Please CONTACT US for more information about this tour.